Pump 1

Another interesting contract that was awarded on the 24th August 1899 was for the manufacture of a water pump for the Longford Water Trust. This was part of Longford’s earliest reticulated water supply and was first located downstream on site at Affleck’s water mills and driven by water turbine. The original contract price was £1500.

An excerpt from the Examiner Monday 19 March 1900:

The new pump for the supply is of the Anderson type, and was planned by Mr. R. Gould to suit the speed of the turbine gearing, and to give the requisite quantity of water. It was made by Messrs. Bogle and Clark, of Launceston, and reflects great credit upon them. It is built upon a concrete foundation, on which is fixed a heavy cast iron bed. The pumps and gearing are attached to this. They are three in number, and so arranged that if desired one or two could be worked without the other, and in addition to this a contrivance is made by which the quantity of water coming into the pumps may be regulated. The plungers of the pumps are made of brass, so as to prevent corrosion. The connecting rods, slipper guides, and crank shaft are all made of steel and beautifully finished. The geared wheels are of the helical pattern, which makes the cogs 50 per cent, stronger. The maximum speed is 60 strokes per minute, but the average speed at which it will be worked will be about 45. This will give at least 10,500 gallons per hour. There is a gauge to indicate the pressure on the pipes, and also a safety valve to prevent them from bursting. In addition to this there is also an air vessel of an entirely new pattern, which is a great improvement. The whole of the machinery is enclosed in a neat and substantial building, from the gable of which the Union Jack was floating in the breeze.

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The pump after restoration

To celebrate Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee, a lamp was erected on 23 June 1887 in front of Mr. Whitfield’s dispensary on the corner of Wellington and Marlborough Streets in Longford. Mr. Whitfield subsequently donated ornamental fixtures for the electric light in 1911. In 1896, Mr. J. Smale secured public subscriptions to erect a fountain at the site of the Jubilee lamp to celebrate Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee in 1897. The structure was manufactured by Bogle & Clark Engineers for Longford Water Trust. The circular cast iron basin was 2 ft. 6 in high and 4ft 6 in in diameter with a depth of 10ins. It was supported by a central fluted column and four legs in the form of horses’ hooves. The column rising from the basin supported the lamp. Yoke maintenance arms were positioned beneath the lantern. The structure having been built to accommodate cattle was no match for the arrival of the motor car. In May 1924, a resident backed his car into it with such force that the fountain was dislodged and the lamp-post broken. Five years later in 1929 the drinking fountain was again repaired after being badly damaged in a collision only to suffer the same fate in 1939 when another motor vehicle collided with it in the early hours of the morning. It was moved 10 feet by the impact and badly damaged. At that time, it was decided to disconnect the water supply to prevent cows from gathering to drink as a separate water source was available for cattle a short distance away. The trough was restored in 1988 by Glasgow Engineering (previously known as Bogle & Clark) as part of Australia’s bicentennial celebrations. It is located in the area known as Heritage Corner.

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Wellington Street Longford
Makers Plaque on the Queen Victoria Jubilee  Memorial Horse Trough
Water Trough 2
Queen Victoria Jubilee Memorial Horse Trough
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