In 1897, Bogle & Clark were contracted to install a new engine and Boiler in the river steamer S.S Agnes This was a large undertaking as the old boiler and compound steam engine had to be removed, all pipe work and engine room fittings replaced. The job was virtually a complete engine room refit. The new Boiler and Triple Expansion Steam Engine were designed and built by Ross and Duncan of Glasgow, Scotland. The river steamer Agnes was built in 1894 at Launceston for the Tamar river trade. She replaced the steamer Indignant which was destroyed by fire the year before, at George Town. Agnes was built by the well-known Launceston ship builder and former Master Warden of the Marine Board of Launceston, Fred Moore. In June 1894 the keel was laid at what was known as the Depot Grounds, an area which now forms part of Royal Park. In November the hull was successfully launched and towed to the Marine Boards crane in the North Esk for fitting out. A feature of the hull was that the main deck projected as much as twenty two inches either side of it. The vessel was ninety two feet in length. The Agnes was a popular steamer and many enjoyed the excursions on her between Launceston and George Town. In May 1920 Agnes was sold to Victorian interests and used as a tug on Port Phillip Bay. Eventually her steam plant was removed and she was converted to sail being rigged as a ketch. She was wrecked on December 14 1933 when she dragged her anchors at Altona. Agnes finally drifted ashore on the rocks behind the Williamstown rifle range where she was pounded to pieces.

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The S.S Agnes on the Tamar River
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S.S Agnes
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